Tuesday, September 30, 2014

More about offshore med schools and residency prospects

Back in April, I blogged about the prospects for graduates of Caribbean medical schools matching in categorical surgical positions and estimated that graduates of two of the more prominent Caribbean schools, St. George's and Ross, had a 2.5 to 3% chance.

What about some of the other Caribbean schools? Hard data are difficult to obtain since most of the schools do not publish match statistics, and in particular, the number of graduates who don't match in any specialty.

Here is what one recent commenter on that April post had to say:

My girlfriend studied at University of Medicine and Health Sciences (UMHS)-St.Kitts in the Caribbean. She is a very hard worker and studied well. All of my savings are gone and extra bank loans add up. No match, no residency, and no more hope. Applied for medical lab tech and waiting. In my opinion, IMG is not an option, try local medical schools and if not try something else.

The UMHS website says 59 of its graduates matched in a specialty in 2014, 2 in preliminary surgery and 2 in general surgery, presumably categorical. The number of graduates of UMHS is not listed although the school apparently has three graduations per year reflecting its three different starting dates for students per year.

Another school, Medical University of the Americas on the island of Nevis, had about 90 matched graduates for 2014, 2 of whom obtained positions in surgery—both preliminary.

An additional commenter on my April post, who turned out to be the owner of a different Caribbean school, said this:

Caribbean medical school is best platform and nice and informative….. Successful communication is key in every successful business…. Understanding your subject and having good knowledge on your blog topic is always essential for a successful blog… Thanks for this post…..

Normally I would have blocked this comment as spam, but before I did so, I googled his school, the American Global University School of Medicine, located in the Central American country of Belize. The International Medical Education Directory lists its total enrollment as 100 students. The school's website does not provide any details about match results for its graduates or much of anything else, such as names of faculty or specific hospitals where students do clinical rotations in the US.

I found some other interesting links—too many to list here—about the school, its officials, and its standing in Belize. You would be wise to google it too, or you can see some links in my comment to the school's owner on my April post.

If you have any interest in attending this or any other school not accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME), you should do a thorough Internet search before going ahead with an application. Do not send money unless you are certain that the school is legitimate and that most of its graduates are obtaining residency positions.

Keep in mind that the number of residency slots available for international graduates will decline even further over the next few years because several new US medical schools will be producing graduates, and many established schools have expanded their classes.


Anonymous said...

so that guy paid for his girlfriend's Caribbean Medical School with his savings? questionable investment there.

Skeptical Scalpel said...

I'm going to agree with you on that. I wrote this post to try to help others decide about that same investment.

Anonymous said...

These graduates are usually rich people's kids, and are often classified as IMG's in Canada, having a heads/leg up on people who do not have English as their first language.
American hospitals suck cash to accommodate these rich kids in their last 1 or 2 clinical yrs.
All about money,,,

Skeptical Scalpel said...

Yes, there is substantial money to be made by hospitals that host these students.

See http://www.nytimes.com/2008/08/05/nyregion/05grenada.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0 and http://www.villagevoice.com/2012-08-08/news/offshore-med-school-scholarships/

JEN said...

I used to work with a MD that went a Caribbean Medical School. He kind of was a laughingstock amongst his peers.

Anonymous said...

I think the chances for a foreign grad to match in surgery is slim. However, if you are a med student who passed your boards recently and graduated recently, there is a lot of opportunity in primary care. In fact the nrmp stats for family medicine, IM, psych, pmnr, etc; really do show success for foreign physicians. Surprisingly, one student matched into plastic. There are random surprises. If you see the match results of the big 3 carribbean schools, Ross, St. George, AUA, there is a lot of surprises. I saw orthopedic! Nothing is impossible, but you have to be that excellent to make into any surgical spot. Or your daddy must really know someone. Last, a lot of these students match in NY, Michigan, Ohio. You won't find them matching at UCLA, USC, etc. Sorry, I'm from sunny california. Truth is people do make it, and the story regarding UMHS does not make sense to me at all. If that person passed all the boards and was a recent grad, he/she can match into psyc, FM, IM. There is something missing. Here in California we have a lack of Spanish speaking physicians and we have developed programs for foreign Spanish speaking medical students. This program teaches them about American medicine, how to study for the boards, and we match them with a mentor. The goal is that they fill the gaps in primary care and help with the spanish speaking population. With our guidance, almost all have matched in primary care spots. The people who have success in surgery are the students who completed a residency in their country. I know I went off topic and that we are discussing Caribbean. I would never send my kid to a foreign medical school or Caribbean. I do want to say that some of the most talented physcians I've worked with immigrated in the 80's early 90's from the Philippines, India, Pakistan, China, etc. I am amazed at their skills. While I am American, I do think having a diverse group of residents in any specialty is important. If you get a guy from India who is really talented and can contribute to your program, who not, he/she will help other residents out too. I do want to say though that some of the top Caribbean grads are incredibly high. This is a small percentage and I think these students have it in their mind this is their only chance and they will do anything and everything to do well. There are many American medical students who barely pass their step 1 and match perfectly fine. If I ever became a Chairman, I would give a foreign student a chance if they did perform so well. A lot of medical grads seem to come from Univ of Guadalajara as well and they do really well. If that UMHS grad is reading this, if I am assuming everything correctly, passing scores first attempt, good LOR's, and you stay involved working with MD's. Meaning do a research project with an MD at a univ, I do think matching in primary care is an option. Good luck to you.

Anonymous said...

One thing I would like to add after researching, UMHS is owned be the original founder of Ross university. Ross University is now owned by Devry. I thought many of you would have found it interesting Devry is involved in medical education. Not only do they make money from med students, they have a nursing program, and Veterinary school. It's all about the Benjamen's! Who wants to start a foreign school with me, seriously? Have a wonderful morning.

artiger said...

Some good physicians, even some dandy surgeons come out of these schools. Given what was said earlier about more students being pumped out of inshore schools along with no expansion of residency positions, this almost seems predatory.

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