Monday, January 15, 2018

Facial exercises to make you look younger? I don't think so.

One would think a study covered by the New York Times would be both scientifically valid and important. Apparently, that is not always the case.

Under the headline “Facial Exercises May Make You Look 3 Years Younger” is a story about a research letter published in JAMA Dermatology. The Times article concludes with a quote from the lead author, “But for now, it is reasonable to consider contorting and pinching up your face if you wish to try to look younger.”

Is it reasonable? Let’s see if this 1½ page research letter proved its point.

Monday, January 8, 2018

Is chronic pain after inguinal hernia repair a big problem?

Yesterday one of my twitter followers posted this:
He was referring to a paper in the British Journal of Surgery that said 15.2% of patients who had inguinal herniorrhaphies complained of severe chronic pain one year after the surgery. Open hernia repairs caused significantly more chronic pain than did endoscopic total extraperitoneal [TEP] repairs, but the reoperation rate was significantly higher for TEP procedures.

The study included almost 23,000 patients and was based on data from the Swedish Hernia Registry and a questionnaire sent to the patients one year after their initial hernia operation. Pain was rated on a scale of 1 to 7 and was considered chronic if it was present for more than 3 months and interfered with daily activities.

The recurrence rate for the 18,000 patients who had open anterior mesh repair was 3.4% compared to 23.3% for the 2688 who had TEP repairs.

The authors concluded that the trade-off for less pain was an increased recurrence rate. Only 232 [1.39%] of the 1666 patients with recurrent hernias had undergone repeat herniorrhaphy.

Some of the comments on Twitter were as follows:


When I was in private practice in the early 1980s, I invited all of my post-op hernia patients to return to my office for yearly follow-up at no charge.

One day, a nice elderly gentleman was sitting in the exam room when I walked in. After an exchange of pleasantries, I asked him how his hernia repair was doing. He said he had no problems and was quite happy.

I had him stand up and when he lifted his gown, I saw a softball-sized recurrent hernia. Ever since then, I have not trusted any studies in which follow-up was not done in person.

Based on my experience, the recurrence rate after groin hernia repairs could even be higher than the Swedish study reported.

The incidence of chronic pain after inguinal herniorrhaphy may depend on how surgeons follow their patients.