Wednesday, August 31, 2011

Surgeons vs. Pilots: There Is No Autopilot in the O.R.

We’ve all heard the comparison of surgeons to pilots.

Surgeons should be more like pilots.
Surgeons need more rest. They should have work hours restrictions like pilots do.
You wouldn’t want to fly with a pilot who had been awake for 24 hours.
Blah, blah blah.

A while back I blogged [see links below] that surgeons really cannot be compared to pilots because, unlike the boring, monotonous work that pilots do, surgeons perform tasks that are highly variable, both mentally and technically. I even said that the only time pilots really have to work is when the plane is taking off or landing. I had no idea how right I was.

Now comes proof. An article from the Associated Press entitled “Automation in the air dulls pilot skill,” discusses some recent plane crashes and notes that pilots increasingly seem to be making poor decisions when confronted with emergencies. Flying a plane is becoming more automated and the pilots’ skills are eroding. New air traffic control mandates are calling for GPS positioning rather than the use of radar. This will allow more accurate knowledge of a plane’s true location enabling planes to descend faster and closer together, possibly leading to more challenges for pilots.

The following statement sums up the current state of affairs:

Even when not using the new procedures, airlines direct their pilots to switch on the autopilot about a minute and a half after takeoff when the plane reaches about 1,000 feet, [Bob] Coffman [member of the FAA pilot training committee and an airline captain] said. The autopilot generally doesn't come off until about a minute and a half before landing, he said.

Do you get it? With the rare exception of the malfunctioning autopilot, pilots are actually hands-on flying their airplanes for 3 minutes per flight.

There is no autopilot in the operating room. Machines can’t perform surgery. Even the robot has to be guided by a surgeon every second.

So please tell me how can you compare what a surgeon does to what a pilot does? 


9 comments:

James said...

I think when people make that comparrison, they mean to use the safety record of pilots as something surgeons should aspire to. Both are responsible for other people's lives. Pilots have multiple systems and several layers of redundancy in place to protect passengers. Surgeons have more team and system support now than they used to. But additional regulations, such as having limited work hours the way pilots are regulated, would seem to make sense. The fact that a surgeon doesn't have anything equivalent to an "autopilot" is an argument for putting more safety features in place, not fewer.

Skeptical Scalpel said...

I understand your point but my post was directed at those who try to compare the working hours of pilots to those of surgeons. The comparison is not valid because surgeons and pilots do not do the same kinds of work.

Limiting work hours might "seem to make sense," but there are no data to support that. Recent papers have shown that outcomes of complex surgery done at night are no different that similar operations done in the daytime. Please read my previous blog about this at http://is.gd/TBnRRI

Shanky said...

Nice Job

Anonymous said...

some physicians are too pilots. i wonder what, if anything, that might tell us.

this old article is still interesting:
http://www.faa.gov/library/reports/medical/oamtechreports/1960s/media/AM66-25.pdf

Skeptical Scalpel said...

Yes, many MDs have become pilots. Not many pilots have become MDs. Interesting link. MDs are overconfident, a well-known risk factor for crashes.

Anonymous said...

First of all, by comparing professions, you are revealing your insecurity. It is highly immature to compare professions for the purpose of winning the who-is-better argument.

You say that 'unlike the boring, monotonous work that pilots do, surgeons perform tasks that are highly variable, both mentally and technically', you have simply no idea how fun flying is for those who love it. If we were to make a surgeon construct a building, I am pretty sure he would find it boring, unless he has interest in Civil Engineering.

If you're referring to 'the usual routine of pilots' as monotonous, it as routine as a normal surgery. Whereas variables are concerned, you failed to do your homework, because every flight is a different flight.

The complexities of managing the 'automation' cannot be excluded. Pilots have to continuously monitor the equipment with full concentration and even slightest of errors have resulted in disasters.

By looking at your blog, it is clear you have some kind of a hatred for pilots.

And by the way, doctors who are pilots don't die because of their 'over-confidence', but lack of experience and judgment (Google for doctor killer aircraft).

Do unbiased research before puking.

Skeptical Scalpel said...

I appreciate your taking the time to comment. I don't hate pilots. What I don't like is people who are neither pilots nor surgeons trying to equate the two.

I sometimes exaggerate to make a point. If you've read some of my other posts on this topic, you will note that I discussed things like the distraction that the Air France crew faced from multiple alarms. This is something that occurs in medicine too. I empathized with their plight and pointed out the similarities between them and us.

Anonymous said...

I couldn't agree more with this post. Sure, we can learn by "checking" and "double-checking" everything before we cut. But we don't learn on simulators. . .when we cut and crash, it is always for real. Besides, if I was supposed to learn how to set-up, maintain, clean, transport, and stock all the equipment and supplies I use, I would probably do even MORE yelling at the incompetents I work with because, then, I REALLY know how to do everybody's job in the OR (except the anesthesiologists!)

Captain of the ship? I don't think so.

Well, "they say" the "Pilot is committed. If he/she crashes, they die with the passengers."

You mean if I stick myself with that HIV/Hep C needle I won't die because I'm not committed.

Great column. . .as usual.

Skeptical Scalpel said...

Good points and thanks for the kind words.

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